Uluru, one of the world’s most recognisable natural landmarks, is a symbol of Australia’s desert landscape.

The striking red rock sits amidst the harsh Aussie Outback, at the heart of the country’s Red Centre. It truly is a magnificent sight to see in person, with many travellers opting to walk around the base of Uluru to see every feature and angle of the rock.

About the Base Walk

Most visitors opt to see Uluru from one of the many viewing platforms on offer. However, to get up close and personal, walking around the base of Uluru is a must-do. A couple of years ago, many enjoyed climbing the rock instead, hiking up to the top to see the entire region surrounding Uluru. However, this activity was offensive to the local Aboriginal people, known as the Anangu tribe, as Uluru is a significant cultural and historic site to the local community. Therefore, the walk around the base is the closest a traveller can get to Uluru respectfully and safely.

Follow the footsteps of the ancestral beings that shaped the landscape as you walk around the base of the rock. The track is about 10 kilometres long, with visitors able to trek around the entire Uluru base walk, or just concentrate on one or more of its sections. If you choose to do the entire loop, it will take you around 3 to 4 hours depending on your fitness level.

Each section will look and feel completely different, with some regions surprisingly green and thick with plant life, whereas other spots feel open and vast with barely any shade. Travel along the base walk and wander through the acacia woodlands and grassed claypans, encountering bloodwoods, native grasses, and many waterways and waterholes. The base walk is the best way to discover the entire region of Uluru, as you get to see the immense size of the rock while also marvelling at the scenery surrounding it.

Related article: Take a Camel Ride in Uluru

Explore the Uluru Tours